Nada te Turbe

“Nada te Turbe”–“Let nothing disturb you” (Teresa of Avila)  sung by a virtual choir of Carmelites!

Translation of lyrics:

Let nothing disturb you

Let nothing disturb you,
let nothing frighten you,
everything passes,
but God stays.
Pacience reaches it all;
he who has God
nothing lacks:
God alone suffices.

Lift your thinking,
raise up to heaven,
let nothing anguish you,
let nothing disturb you.

Follow Jesus Christ
with an open heart,
and, no matter what may come,
let nothing frighten you.

See the glory of the world?
It’s vainglory;
it is not everlasting,
everything passes.

Yearn for the celestial
that lasts forever:
faithful and rich in promisses,
God doesn’t change.

Love it the way it deserves
inmense kindness;
but there is not fine love
without the patience.

Confidence and alive faith
let the soul mantain,
that he who believes and hopes 1.
reaches it all.

Although harassed by hell
one may see himself,
he who has God
will defeat its rage.

Come abandonment,
crosses, misfortune;
God being your treasure,
you lack nothing.

Go, then, wordly goods
go, vain happiness;
even if everything is lost
God alone suffices.

The Father is crazy about us

Fr. Barron aptly describes God’s irrational love for us:

The Lost Drachma (James Tissot)

The Lost Drachma (James Tissot)

Jesus’ original audience must have been puzzled indeed when they heard one of the Lord’s better-known parables for the first time.  “What man among you having a hundred sheep and losing one of them would not leave the ninety-nine in the desert and go after the lost one . . . ” Well, they probably thought, precisely no man!  Sheep were a precious commodity int he ancient world, and no shepherd worth his salt would willingly risk ninety-nine in order to find one.  The Lord’s follow-up story would most likely have left them equally confused.  “What woman having ten coins and losing one would not . . . sweep the house, searching carefully until she finds it?  And when she does find it, she calls . . . he friends and neighbors and says . . . ‘Rejoice with me.'”  The coin in quetion was of very little value, less than a penny.  For that minuscule amount of money, she would turn her house upside down and then, upon discovering it, would call for a party?  Her friends would think her mad.

And thus we come to the point.  Jesus speaks of the God who loves us lavishly, extravagantly, exuberantly, even, dare I say it, irrationally.  Think of the father of the Prodigal Son, who violates every canon of justice and right order when he welcomes back (with a party!) the child who had spurned him.  One way to sum up the good news of the Gospel is to say, quite simply, that the Father of Jesus Christ is crazy about us.

“In the midst of brokenness”

Pointing you over to A Holy Experience today:

copyright Ann Voskamp

copyright Ann Voskamp

He points a finger at me, shakes it like a wand, like a prayer, like shaking me awake.

“I need to talk with you.”

Gordon’s on his tiptoes, looking for me through the lunch crowd, punctuating each word high in the air with his left pointer finger. “I’ve got a question for you.” He’s stabbing the air. I feel poked in the chest, pushed up against the back of my chair. I reach for water, something to wet a thick, scratchy throat.

A question? What kind of question? Why ask me a question? How can he ask anything of me — and think he’d get anything worthwhile?

I live in the curve of questions, sheltered under and arch of mystery, all my declarative periods couched with a questioning mark. 

I know little and answers elude me and my world is wide expanses of wondering andseeking is the way I find my way. Gordon’s scanning to see if there’s an empty chair at my table.

He’s carrying his plate high, his lunch, a green salad, a pulled pork sandwich, baked beans. I lay down my fork, all those tines.

“But…” Can he hear me over this din? “I won’t have answers.”

You can read the rest here.

The Butterfly Circus

Friday: from the archives: 

One of the sisters called my attention to this beautiful short film.  I’d love to read your comments.

A message of the movie is this:

     No one has been born by chance and no one was consulted before being brought into the world.  The essence and existence of each person is something of extraordinary value, something very important . . . And if no one exists by chance, there is no chance involved in his particular physical and psychological make-up.  There is also a reason for the fact that everyone has his own individual temperament, qualities, a particular degree of intelligence, sensitivity and even particular features . . . Everything has a reason for being and existing and each creature has been appropriately gifted for the end which it is to fulfill in the universe.  (Frederico Suarez, Mary of Nazareth)

Call out to Mary

“O you, whoever you are, who feel that in the tidal wave of this world you are nearer to being tossed about among the squalls and gales than treading on dry land, if you do not want to founder in the tempest, do not avert your eyes from the brightness of this star.  When the wind of temptation blows up within you, when you strike upon the rock of temptation, gaze up at this star, call out to Mary.  Whether you are being tossed about by the waves of pride or ambition or slander or jealousy, gaze up at this star, call out to Mary.  When rage or greed or fleshly desires are battering the skiff of your soul, gaze up at Mary.  When the immensity of your sins weighs you down and you are bewildered by the loathsomeness of your conscience, when the terrifying thought of judgment appalls you and you begin to founder in the gulf of sadness and despair, think of Mary.  In dangers, in hardships, in every doubt, think of Mary, call out to Mary.  Keep her in your mouth, keep her in your heart. Follow the example of her life and you will obtain the favor of her prayer.  Following her, you will never go astray.  Asking her help, you will never despair.  Keeping her in your thoughts, you will never wander away.  With your hand in hers, you will never stumble.  With her protecting you, you will not be afraid.  With her leading you, you will never tire.  Her kindness will see you through.” (Bernard of Clairvaux}

 

Don’t Be Afraid

Sr. Dorcee:

Amen.

Originally posted on Barnstorming:

sunset96142

hydrangea9614

To acknowledge the significance of this day and the events of 13 years ago:

The grace of God means something like:
Here is your life.
You might never have been, but you are,
because the party wouldn’t have been complete without you.
Here is the world.
Beautiful and terrible things will happen.
Don’t be afraid.
I am with you.
~Frederick Buechner
in Wishful Thinking and later in Beyond Words

sunsetweb96143

dogwoodsept

View original

Being afraid

Sr. Dorcee:

What to do when you think your emotions are all wrong . . .

Originally posted on Witnesses to Hope:

I was delighted when I discovered Caryll Houselander.  I found her to be a woman of great honesty about herself and great faith in God.  Here is an excerpt from a letter she wrote, describing how she dealt with great fear as she served as an air raid warden in England during World War I.  Perhaps I’ve already shared it, but it’s worth sharing again.  She offers an approach that I think we can apply to many, if not all, of the challenging emotions we can experience:

During the war I was simply terrified by air raids, and it was my lot to be in every one that happened in London–sometimes on the roofs of these flats, sometimes in the hospital. . . I tried to build up my courage by reason and prayer, etc.  Then one day I realized quite suddenly: As long as I try not to be…

View original 103 more words