On the top of my pile

I am known for surrounding myself with piles of books.  Some are old friends, but most are anticipated new friends.  I thought I would start regularly posting about what I’m reading right now–in case you want to make friends with any of these books.  Here’s what’s there at the moment . . .

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Far too many Catholics have had painful experiences in the Church, and many have simply opted to walk away.

Fr. Berg opens his book with the story of the painful and life-changing crisis he experienced in the Church that ultimately, against the odds, led him to love the Church more intensely notwithstanding the sinfulness of its members.

Along with his own story, Fr. Berg intertwines the stories of other Catholics who have themselves experienced life-changing hurts, but who, in Jesus, found healing.

Riding the momentum of the Year of Mercy, Fr. Berg offers these reflections as a necessary examination of conscience, and a clarion call to Catholics to become healers of an ailing inner culture of our Church, to heed Pope Francis s call to incite a revolution of tenderness in our faith communities.

Ultimately, this book is about hope for wounded believers: If you have been hurt in the Church, Jesus can take you on a journey through your wounds, a journey of healing that will make you an even better human being, a better Christian, and a better disciple.

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The first chapter alone is so worth reading.  An excellent description of how to love/accompany/witness to someone dealing with sexual orientation issues.

Rosaria, by the standards of many, was living a very good life. She had a tenured position at a large university in a field for which she cared deeply. She owned two homes with her partner, in which they provided hospitality to students and activists that were looking to make a difference in the world. In the community, Rosaria was involved in volunteer work. At the university, she was a respected advisor of students and her department’s curriculum. 

Then, in her late 30’s, Rosaria encountered something that turned her world upside down–the idea that Christianity, a religion she had regarded as problematic and sometimes downright damaging, might be right about who God was. That idea seemed to fly in the face of the people and causes that she most loved. What follows is a story of what she describes as a train wreck at the hand of the supernatural. These are her secret thoughts about those events, written as only a reflective English professor could.

And just for fun.  I LOVE these books.  Much to be learned from Mma Ramotswe!

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